Capital Structure

CAPITAL AND CHANGES IN CAPITAL — The capital structure of Swiss Life Holding was as follows on the balance sheet date:

Ordinary share capital: CHF 163 613 375.40, divided into 32 081 054 fully paid registered shares with a par value of CHF 5.10 each
Conditional share capital: CHF 12 032 868.60 divided into 2 359 386 registered shares with a par value of CHF 5.10 each
Authorised share capital: none

The conditional share capital is at the disposal of the holders of conversion or option rights granted by Swiss Life Holding or by companies belonging to the Group in connection with straight bonds or similar bonds issued by Swiss Life Holding or companies belonging to the Group. The shareholders are excluded from subscription rights, but their preemptive subscription rights remain safeguarded. The Board of Directors sets the conversion and option conditions.

Since the establishment of Swiss Life Holding on 17 September 2002, a number of capital market transactions have been conducted. A detailed description of the transactions carried out up to and including the end of 2008 can be found in the Corporate Governance section of the annual reports for the relevant years. The annual reports can be accessed at www.swisslife.com, “Investors” area, “Results & Reports” section, “Archive Reports” and “Annual Reports” subsections (www.swisslife.com/en/annualreports).

On 7 May 2009 the General Meeting of Shareholders of Swiss Life Holding decided on a capital reduction of CHF 51 059 500 by cancelling 3 003 500 registered shares with a par value of CHF 17 each, which were acquired under the share buyback programme approved on 8 May 2008. As a result the share capital decreased from CHF 596 437 418 to CHF 545 377 918. The General Meeting of Shareholders also decided to pay a dividend of CHF 5 per registered share, in the form of a reduction in par value. The share capital thus decreased from CHF 545 377 918 (32 081 054 registered shares, each with par value of CHF 17) to CHF 384 972 648 (32 081 054 registered shares, each with par value of CHF 12). At the same time the conditional share capital was reduced to CHF 28 312 632 (2 359 386 registered shares, each with par value of CHF 12). In 2009 no conversions were made on the 0.625% convertible bond (2004–2010).

At Swiss Life Holding’s General Meeting of Shareholders on 6 May 2010, the shareholders approved a motion to reduce the par value by CHF 2.40 per registered share. Consequently, the share capital fell to CHF 307 978 118.40, divided into 32 081 054 fully paid registered shares with a par value of CHF 9.60 each, and the conditional capital decreased to CHF 22 650 105.60, divided into 2 359386 registered shares with a par value of CHF 9.60 each. Again in 2010 no conversions were made on the 0.625% convertible bond (2004–2010).

On 5 May 2011 the General Meeting of Shareholders of Swiss Life Holding decided to reduce the par value by CHF 4.50 per share from CHF 9.60 to CHF 5.10. The share capital thus decreased to CHF 163 613 375.40, divided into 32 081 054 registered shares. At the same time the conditional capital was reduced to CHF 12 032 868.60, divided into 2 359 386 registered shares with a par value of CHF 5.10 each.

SHARES — 32 081 054 fully paid Swiss Life Holding registered shares with a par value of CHF 5.10 each were outstanding on the balance sheet date. Subject to the 10% limit on voting rights set out in the Articles of Association (cf. the section on “Shareholders’ participation rights”), each share grants the right to one vote at the General Meeting of Shareholders.

There are no outstanding shares with either increased or limited voting rights, privileged or restricted voting rights, privileged dividend entitlements or other preferential rights.

There are no other equity securities besides the registered shares mentioned above, nor do any participation certificates or dividend right certificates exist.

Regulations are in place to govern transactions in Swiss Life Holding shares carried out by Swiss Life Group employees. Pursuant to the Code of Conduct and the Swiss Life Group’s Directive on Insider Information, all purchases and sales of Swiss Life Holding securities made by members of senior management or employees who are privy to confidential information are subject to a reporting requirement. Transactions by persons who, by virtue of their position, have regular access to insider information are also subject to a prior approval requirement. A general blackout period is imposed annually from 1 January until 24 hours after the year-end results have been presented and from 1 July until 24 hours after the half-year results have been presented, as well as from ten days before until 24 hours after publication of the interim statements for the first and third quarters.

Additional information on the Swiss Life share is available in the section “Information on Share Performance and Historical Comparison” in the Business Review.

LIMITATIONS ON TRANSFERABILITY AND NOMINEE REGISTRATIONS — Swiss Life Holding shares are not subject to any limitations on transferability. According to the Articles of Association, resolutions for the introduction, amendment or repeal of limitations on transferability must be put before the General Meeting of Shareholders and must be approved by two thirds of the voting shares represented and by an absolute majority of the share par value represented.

The Board of Directors may refuse to recognise an acquirer as a shareholder with voting rights if, upon request, the acquirer does not expressly declare that he has acquired the registered shares in his own name and for his own account.

Swiss and foreign banks, securities brokers and companies acting on their behalf may be entered in the share register as nominees if they are holding shares of Swiss Life Holding in their custody for the account of the beneficial owners. Professional asset managers may also be registered as nominees if, in a fiduciary capacity, they have deposited Swiss Life Holding shares for the account of third parties with Swiss or foreign banks or securities brokers in their own name. Nominees are required to be subject to banking or financial market supervision. A request must be filed to register as a nominee. The voting right representation is restricted to 10% of the share capital overall, whereby nominees who are connected with regard to capital or voting rights under uniform management or contractual agreement will be counted as a single shareholder. The Board of Directors may approve exceptions to these restrictions on registration, observing the principle of responsible judgement. No such exceptions were granted during the period under review.

CONVERTIBLE BONDS AND OPTIONS — No convertible bond issues of Swiss Life Holding were outstanding on the balance sheet date.

As at 31 December 2011, Swiss Life Holding and its Group companies had not granted any options on rights to participate in Swiss Life Holding.

 

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